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Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM)
Recipe of the Week

Sept. 24, 2013

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Did you know that carob comes from the pod of a tree that grows along the Mediterranean Sea?  The pod contains a sweet, edible pulp. Once dried and roasted, the pulp is ground into a powder that can be used instead of cocoa powder.

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Hot Carob "Cocoa"

carob

As the weather starts to cool down, turn to this comforting drink to help warm you up! A deliciously different twist on the classic hot chocolate.

A cup of Hot Carob "Cocoa" is a nice treat or simple dessert. It is surprisingly thick and creamy tasting, even when made with water, and its flavor is reminiscent of bittersweet chocolate. Because carob is somewhat sweeter than cocoa powder, you may not need to add much, if any, sweetener.

Makes 1 serving

Ingredients

2 tablespoons unsweetened carob powder
1/4 teaspoon cornstarch or arrowroot
6-8 ounces water or fortified vanilla, soy, or rice milk
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract (omit if using vanilla, soy, or rice milk)
sweetener of your choice (optional)

Directions

In a small saucepan whisk together carob powder and cornstarch or arrowroot. Gradually whisk in water or nondairy milk, keeping the mixture as smooth as possible. Heat, stirring often, until steaming hot. Stir in vanilla, if using, and sweetener to taste.

Tip: If you prefer, you can substitute unsweetened cocoa powder for the carob powder, or try a combination of the two as you wean yourself off chocolate.

This recipe is easily doubled, tripled, or quadrupled

Per serving (made with water): 37 calories; 0.1 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 2.3% calories from fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 0.7 g protein; 13.2 g carbohydrates; 4.9 g sugar; 5.6 g fiber; 9 mg sodium; 52 mg calcium; 0.4 mg iron; 0 mg vitamin C; 1 mcg Beta Carotene; 0.1 mg vitamin E

 

Source: Breaking the Food Seduction by Neal Barnard, M.D.; recipe by Jo Stepaniak; © Jo Stepaniak 2005, published by permission.

Please feel free to tailor PCRM recipes to suit your individual dietary needs.

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Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
5100 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Ste.400, Washington DC, 20016
Phone: 202-686-2210     Email: pcrm@pcrm.org