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Recipe of the Week

April 21, 2015

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The garlic in this recipe adds flavor and many health benefits. Garlic contains two main medicinal compounds—allicin and diallyl sulphides—which can help boost the immune system and fight off cancer.

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Parsnip Mashed Potatoes

Parsnip Mashed Potatoes

If parsnips are new to you, just think of them as slightly starchier carrots. This version of mashed potatoes is virtually fat free!

Makes about 4 cups (4 servings)

Ingredients

3 whole garlic cloves
1 parsnip, peeled
2 large russet potatoes, peeled
3/4 cup water
1/2 cup unsweetened soy or other nondairy milk
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/8 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

Directions

Spread garlic in a medium pot.

Cut parsnip into 1-inch chunks and place over garlic. Cut potatoes into 1-inch chunks and spread over parsnips. Add water. Bring to a low simmer. Cover pan, reduce heat to low, and cook for about 25 minutes until tender when pierced with a knife. Check occasionally, adding extra water a tablespoon at a time if the pot becomes dry.

Mash with a potato masher or fork, then stir in enough non-dairy milk to obtain a creamy consistency. Add salt and black pepper.

Stored in a covered container in the refrigerator, leftover Parsnip Mashed Potatoes will keep for up to 2 days.

Per serving: Calories: 161; Fat: 0.6 g; Saturated Fat: 0.1 g; Calories from Fat: 3.4%; Cholesterol: 0 mg; Protein: 4.1 g; Carbohydrates: 36.1 g; Sugar: 3 g; Fiber: 4.3 g; Sodium: 328 mg; Calcium: 63 mg; Iron: 0.9 mg; Vitamin C: 15.1 mg; Beta Carotene: 3 mcg; Vitamin E: 0.3 mg

Source: The Survivor’s Handbook: Eating Right for Cancer Survival by Neal D. Barnard, M.D. and Jennifer Reilly, R.D.

Please feel free to tailor Physicians Committee recipes to suit your individual dietary needs.

  Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

5100 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.
Suite 400
Washington, D.C. 20016
Contact: 202-686-2210
E-mail: info@pcrm.org
Website: www.pcrm.org

Food for  Life

Food for Life is an award-winning Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine program designed by physicians, nurses, and registered dietitians that offers cancer, diabetes, and kids classes that focus on the lifesaving effects of healthful eating. Each class includes information about how certain foods and nutrients work to promote health, along with cooking demonstrations of simple and nutritious recipes that can be recreated easily at home. Learn more here >>

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Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
5100 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Ste.400, Washington DC, 20016
Phone: 202-686-2210 Email: pcrm@pcrm.org

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