Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM)
Recipe of the Week

Jan. 13, 2015

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International Conference on Nutrition in MedicineJoin Neal Barnard, M.D., and other prominent speakers at the 2015 International Conference on Nutrition in Medicine: Cardiovascular Disease.

Garbanzo Salad Romaine Wraps

Garbanzo Salad Romaine Wraps

In this recipe, salad becomes a finger food as romaine lettuce leaves are used to wrap a tasty garbanzo filling. This makes for a higher fiber and more refreshing wrap.

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans, or 1 1/2 cups cooked garbanzo beans
4 large romaine lettuce leaves
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon stone-ground mustard
2 - 3 tablespoons dairy- and egg-free mayonnaise substitute
3 green onions, chopped
1/2 cup finely chopped celery
1/2 cup finely chopped or grated carrot
1 medium tomato, or 6–8 cherry tomatoes, cut in half

Directions

Drain beans, then mash with a fork or potato masher, leaving some chunks. Add carrot, celery, green onions, mayonnaise substitute, mustard, salt, and black pepper. Mix well.

Place about 1/4 cup of the mixture on each lettuce leaf. Add tomato, then roll the lettuce around the filling and serve.

Stored in a covered container in the refrigerator, leftover Garbanzo Salad Romaine Wrap filling will keep for up to 3 days.

Variations:

Garbanzo Salad Sandwich: Spread garbanzo mixture on whole-grain bread. Top with tomato slices, lettuce leaves, and another slice of bread. Makes about 3 sandwiches.

Garbanzo Salad Pockets: Place about 1/4 cup of the garbanzo mixture into a pita pocket. Add chopped cucumber, tomato slices, and shredded lettuce. Makes about 6 pockets.

Per serving: 163 calories; 4 g fat; 0.5 g saturated fat; 22% calories from fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 8 g protein; 25.6 g carbohydrates; 3.5 g sugar; 6.5 g fiber; 525 mg sodium; 72 mg calcium; 2.9 mg iron; 15.2 mg vitamin C; 2555 mcg beta-carotene; 1.2 mg vitamin E

Source: The Survivor’s Handbook: Eating Right for Cancer Survival by Neal D. Barnard, M.D., and Jennifer Reilly, R.D.

Please feel free to tailor Physicians Committee recipes to suit your individual dietary needs.

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